By Shauna Bolton

 

You wanted help figuring out commas, and here it is.

 

Rule 4— Where NOT to Put Commas

  • DO NOT put a comma
    • between the subject and the verb
    • between the verb and its object.

 

Example 1: Comma between Subject and Verb – “To be” Verb

WRONG

Secretary of the Interior, is a Cabinet-level position in the American government.

CORRECT

Secretary of the Interior is a Cabinet-level position in the American government.

 

 Example 2: Comma between Subject and Verb – Active Verb

 WRONG

The United States Senate, confirms nominations to Cabinet-level positions.

CORRECT

The United States Senate confirms nominations to Cabinet-level positions.

 

 Example 3: Comma between Verb and Object – Active Verb

 WRONG

The United States Senate confirms, nominations to Cabinet-level positions.

CORRECT

The United States Senate confirms nominations to Cabinet-level positions.

 Note: “To be” verbs – is, am, are, was, were – are stative verbs that express a state, condition, or relation. There is NO COMMA between a stative verb and its complement noun or its complement adjective. Stative verbs DO NOT have direct objects.

 

QUICK CHECK

Identify and explain the comma error(s) in each sentence.

  1. I came home from the supermarket, and put, the groceries away.
  2. Mom made, spaghetti for dinner but she burned, it.
  3. My father lost, his wallet, and his keys.
  4. The solution to the problem is, actually very simple.
  5. Terry hates, liver and onions, and feeds, them to the dog.

 

ANSWERS

  1. supermarket, and (compound predicate – no comma)

put, the groceries (verb and object – no comma)

  1. made, spaghetti (verb and object – no comma)

dinner but she (compound sentence – use comma)

burned, it (verb and object – no comma)

  1. lost, his wallet (verb and object – no comma)

wallet, and (compound direct object – no comma)

  1. is, actually (stative verb is, adjective complement actually very simple – no comma)
  2. hates, liver (verb and object – no comma)

onions, and (compound predicate – no comma)

feeds, them (verb and object – no comma)

 

We hope you found this lesson helpful. Learning where NOT to put commas is just as important as learning where to correctly place them.

Please leave your comments and

questions at the bottom of this

page.

 

 

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http://www.ourwritersjourney.com/2017/04/11/making-peace-with-commas-part-4/
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